Monday, April 13, 2020

COVID-19 Fact Sheet


COVID-19 Fact Sheet

What is coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)? How does it spread? What are its symptoms? (Center for Disease Control and Prevention)
·         Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory illness that can spread from person to person. The virus that causes COVID-19 is a novel coronavirus that was first identified during an investigation into an outbreak in Wuhan, China.
·         For most people, the immediate risk of becoming seriously ill from the virus that causes COVID-19 is thought to be low.
o   Older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions may be at higher risk for more serious complications from COVID-19.
·         The virus that causes COVID-19 probably emerged from an animal source, but is now spreading from person to person. The virus is thought to spread mainly between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet) through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. It also may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.
·         Patients with COVID-19 have had mild to severe respiratory illness with symptoms of fever, cough, and/or shortness of breath.

How can I protect myself and others? (CDC)
·         Clean your hands often.
o   Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
o   If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
o   Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
·         Avoid close contact.
o   Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
o   Stay at home as much as possible.
o   Put distance between yourself and other people.
§  Practice social or physical distancing by staying at least 6 feet from other people. Do not gather in groups. Stay out of crowded places or gatherings.
§  Remember that some people without symptoms may be able to spread the virus.
§  If you have to go grocery shopping, try and send only one person from your family.
·         Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others.
o   You could spread COVID-19 to others even if you do not feel sick.
o   Everyone should wear a cloth face cover when they have to go out in public, for example to the grocery store or to pick up other necessities.
§  Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.
o   The cloth face mask is meant to protect other people in case you are infected.
o   Do NOT use a facemask meant for a healthcare worker.
o   Continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face mask cover is not a substitute for social distancing.
·         Cover coughs and sneezes.
o   If you are in a private setting and do not have on your cloth face covering, remember to always cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.
o   Throw used tissues in the trash.
o   Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
·         Clean and disinfect.
o   Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.
o   If surfaces are dirty, clean them: Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.

Steps to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 if you are sick (CDC)
·         Stay home except to get medical care.
o   Most people with COVID-19 have mild illness and are able to recover at home without medical care. Do not leave your home, except to get medical care. Do not visit public areas.
o   Call ahead before visiting your doctor. This will help the office protect themselves and other patients.
·         Separate yourself from other people in your home, this is known as home isolation.
o   As much as possible, stay away from others. You should stay in a specific “sick room” if possible, and away from other people in your home. Use a separate bathroom, if available.
·         If you are sick or caring for others, wear a facemask, including before you enter a healthcare provider’s office.
·         Cover your coughs and sneezes.
o   Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue, throw used tissues in a lined trash can, and immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
·         Avoid sharing personal household items.
o   Do not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people in your home.
o   After using these items, wash them thoroughly with soap and water or put in the dishwasher.
·         Clean all “high-touch” surfaces every day.
o   Clean high-touch surfaces in your isolation area (“sick room” and bathroom) every day; let a caregiver clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces in other areas of the home.
·         Monitor your symptoms.
o   Common symptoms of COVID-19 include fever and cough. Trouble breathing is a more serious symptom that means you should get medical attention.
·         If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately.
o   Emergency warning signs include trouble breathing, persistent pain or pressure in the chest, new confusion or inability to arouse, and bluish lips or face.
o   Remember to call your doctor or emergency room before going in and tell them your symptoms. They will tell you what to do. If available, put on a facemask before you enter the building. If you can’t put on a facemask, cover your coughs and sneezes. Try and stay at least 6 feet away from other people. This will help protect the people in the office or waiting room.
·         How to discontinue home isolation
o   If you will not have a test to determine if you are still contagious, you can leave home after these three things have happened:
§  You have had no fever for at least 72 hours (that is three full days of no fever without the use of medicine that reduces fever) AND
§  Other symptoms have improved (for example, when your cough or shortness of breath have improved) AND
§  At least 7 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared
o   If you will be tested to determine if you are still contagious, you can leave home after these three things have happened:
§  You no longer have a fever (without the use of medicine that reduces fevers) AND
§  Other symptoms have improved (for example, when your cough and shortness of breath have improved) AND
§  You received two negative tests in a row, 24 hours apart. Your doctor will follow CDC guidelines.

Resources Used
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “How to Protect Yourself and Others.” https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/prevention-H.pdf
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “SHARE FACTS ABOUT COVID-19.” https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/share-facts-h.pdf
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  “Steps to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 if you are sick.” https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/downloads/sick-with-2019-nCoV-fact-sheet.pdf
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “What you need to know about coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).” https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/downloads/2019-ncov-factsheet.pdf
How COVID-19 Could Impact Victims/Survivors of Violence

Our Wind River community is going through a difficult time. COVID-19 is a serious global public health threat and our leaders are taking appropriate steps to contain the virus and keep everyone healthy and safe. We are very thankful that COVID-19 is being taken seriously, but we are also concerned that victims/survivors on Wind River may be cut off from the resources and support they need.

Crisis situations always have a heavy impact on victims/survivors of violence, especially those who are also members of marginalized communities (such as people of color, LGBTQI+ folks, people with lower incomes). Likewise, we expect that COVID-19 will increase risk factors for violence and isolate and endanger victims/survivors.

In order to effectively advocate for victims/survivors during COVID-19, it’s crucial to understand how they are being uniquely affected by it. Below are just a few examples to consider as we seek to support victims/survivors, raise awareness, and offer important resources for those who need them.

1. Social isolation means staying at home, but some homes can be unsafe.
The practice of social distancing can be dangerous if a person’s home is unsafe. If a victim lives with an abuser, they may be at risk for sexual/domestic violence at home. Due to COVID-19, victims may have less access to outside resources/help and tangible support from their family and community.

Additionally, heightened stress and tension in the home may contribute to an increase in controlling and abusive behavior. Abusers may seek to limit information about COVID-19 or use the virus as an excuse to control finances, police a victim’s body and behavior, cut off contact with friends and family, and make threats to withhold vital resources.

2. Vulnerable people may be forced to engage in survival sex.
As pressure to stay home mounts and more businesses/organizations close, many people are being left without paychecks and shelter. They may be forced to engage in survival sex, which means they are exchanging sex to meet a basic survival need. This might mean access to food, a place to live, or another necessity.

3. Loss in income may force victims/survivors to continue living with their abusers.
Leaving abusive situations often takes money. Many people in abusive situations save for months and even years to afford an apartment or some kind of exit strategy. If they experience a reduction in income due to COVID-19, they may be forced to postpone their exit strategy and continue living in an abusive situation.

4. Extreme stress in emergencies can trigger trauma.  
People who have experienced a violent trauma such as sexual victimization may be triggered by high levels of stress due to COVID-19. Crises can open old wounds and increase anxiety. Further, social distancing can increase a sense of isolation from others, making them feel like they are alone and far from help.

5. Children are more likely to witness and experience violence.
Now that schools are closed on Wind River and daycare options are limited, many children must stay at home during the day. This added stress can increase risk factors for violence in a home. Further, children in abusive situations will be spending more time at home, and they may be more likely to witness or experience abuse and less able to report abuse to an adult who can help.

6. There may be more barriers for victims to access sexual and domestic violence services – but those services are still available!
Many programs/services are making difficult decisions about how to best serve victims/survivors while also prioritizing health and safety. Though many local sexual and domestic violence programs are continuing to offer their services either in-person or online, many people may not know how to access help or that help is even still available to them during COVID-19. In the next section are resources available to those who need them on Wind River, with local and national resources.

National resources for those in need of support:
·         The National Domestic Violence Hotline
o   A 24/7 free and confidential hotline for those experiencing domestic violence. Online chat also available.
o   Phone Number: (800) 799-7233
·         The National Sexual Assault Hotline
o   A 24/7 free and confidential hotline for those experiencing sexual assault. Online chat also available.
o   Phone Number: (800) 656-HOPE (4673)
·         The StrongHearts Native Helpline
o   A safe domestic violence and dating violence helpline for American Indians and Alaska Natives, offering culturally-appropriate support and advocacy daily from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. CT. Anonymous and confidential.
o   Phone Number: (844)-7NATIVE(762-8483)

Local resources for those in need of support:
·         Red Paint Alliance
o   “Serving the families in crisis on the Wind River Indian Reservation who are victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, stalking, and human trafficking.”
o   Physical office is currently closed, but they are still offering all services on a case-by-case basis, including emergency shelter. All staff are currently tele-working, and can be reached through the 24-hour crisis line, email, or the Facebook page.
o   Phone Number: (307) 349-9813
o   Email: info@wrredpaint.com
·         Fremont County Alliance Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault
o   “While the physical office is closed, we are still meeting with clients through appointment to avoid spread of illness, still doing protective orders of all types in all the courts, providing shelter by need, and offering tele-advocacy and crisis intervention 24/7.”
o   Phone Number: (307) 856-4734
·         Wyoming Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault – Legal Program
o   “The WCADVSA provides expert legal advice and direct representation to survivors of sexual and domestic violence and stalking. This includes legal needs such as housing, safety, family matters, and other issues intertwined with instances of violence.” Although our physical office is closed, you may call our phone number or send us an email.
o   Phone Number: (307) 349-8368

Help us raise awareness about how COVID-19 is impacting victims/survivors and increasing risk factors for violence. Together we can make our community safer for everyone during these turbulent times. Thank you.



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